Bermuda

Bermuda

Bermuda is located in the Subtropics and has a Humid subtropical climate. Bermuda experiences hot and humid summers with the majority of precipitation falling from isolated showers and thunderstorms. It is not uncommon, during the summer, to ride on sunbaked roads, then round a corner to come suddenly on drenched and steaming tarmac where a shower has passed only minutes earlier. Occasional Tropical Waves and Tropical Cyclones can also play a role in summertime precipitation totals when they exit the tropics. Winters are mild, with temperatures rarely falling below 10 °C (50 °F). Precipitation in wintertime is controlled by sometimes frequent fronts moving eastward from the North American continent. During the peak of winter in Bermuda, these fronts can be followed by northwesterly gales and gusty showers that sometimes contain small hail. While the highest temperatures officially observed in Bermuda are near 34 °C (93 °F) the high humidity often results in a heat index that would be considered dangerous, particularly for strenuous activities in the sun. Conversely, while sub-freezing (32 F.) temperatures officially have never been observed in Bermuda, the strong winds following winter-season cold fronts can result in wind chill values dramatically below actual air temperatures. While precipitation is fairly evenly distributed through the year, it is somewhat less reliable in April and May, Bermuda’s driest months on average, when the Bermuda-Azores High can bring extended dry spells.

Bermuda’s weather is largely controlled by the position and structure of the Bermuda-Azores High. This semi-permanent, warm, subtropical high pressure (often centered southwest of the Azores) extends a ridge westward toward Bermuda during the spring and summer when the high is most intense. Oriented west-to-east to the near south of Bermuda, clockwise flow around the surface high brings prevailing winds from the southwest for much of the summer and subsequently prevents fronts from reaching the island. However, the ridge sometimes shifts to the north of the island allowing easterly or northeasterly winds. In fall and winter, the ridge near Bermuda becomes more transient, allowing frontal systems to affect the island. Winds around these systems are much more variable (and often stronger) but typically settle out of the southwest ahead of a cold front and shift to the west or northwest behind a cold front. Because Bermuda is over 1000 km away from the nearest land, even Polar and Arctic air masses following wintertime cold fronts are moderated greatly by the relatively warm Gulf Stream and western Atlantic Ocean waters between North America and Bermud. (Source: Wikipedia)

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