Nuts

This page shows all nuts by categories.

AmondAlmonds

The almond (/ɑːmənd/ or /ɑːlmənd/) (Prunus dulcis, syn. Prunus amygdalus, Amygdalus communis, Amygdalus dulcis) is a species of tree native to the Middle East and South Asia.

“Almond” is also the name of the edible and widely cultivated seed of this tree. Within the genus Prunus, it is classified with the peach in the subgenus Amygdalus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated shell (endocarp) surrounding the seed. (Source: Wikipedia)

cashewCashew nuts

The cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale) is a tropical evergreen tree that produces the cashew seed and the cashew apple.

It can grow as high as 14 metres (46 ft), but the dwarf cashew, growing up to 6 metres (20 ft), has proved more profitable, with earlier maturity and higher yields. (Source: Wikipedia)

ChestnutChestnuts

Hazelnut is the nut of the hazel and therefore includes any of the nuts deriving from species of the genus Corylus, especially the nuts of the species Corylus avellana. It is also known as cobnut or filbert nut according to species. A cob is roughly spherical to oval, about 15–25 millimetres (0.59–0.98 in) long and 10–15 millimetres (0.39–0.59 in) in diameter, with an outer fibrous husk surrounding a smooth shell. A filbert is more elongated, being about twice as long as its diameter. The nut falls out of the husk when ripe, about seven to eight months after pollination. The kernel of the seed is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. Hazelnuts are also used for livestock feed, as are chestnuts and acorns. The seed has a thin, dark brown skin, which is sometimes removed before cooking. (Source: Wikipedia)

HazelnutHazelnuts

Hazelnut is the nut of the hazel and therefore includes any of the nuts deriving from species of the genus Corylus, especially the nuts of the species Corylus avellana. It is also known as cobnut or filbert nut according to species. A cob is roughly spherical to oval, about 15–25 millimetres (0.59–0.98 in) long and 10–15 millimetres (0.39–0.59 in) in diameter, with an outer fibrous husk surrounding a smooth shell. A filbert is more elongated, being about twice as long as its diameter. The nut falls out of the husk when ripe, about seven to eight months after pollination. The kernel of the seed is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. Hazelnuts are also used for livestock feed, as are chestnuts and acorns. The seed has a thin, dark brown skin, which is sometimes removed before cooking. (Source: Wikipedia)

PistacchioPistachios

The pistachio (/pɪˈstæʃiˌoʊ/, -/stɑːʃiˌoʊ/, Persian: پسته‎‎; Pistacia vera), a member of the cashew family, is a small tree originating fromCentral Asia and the Middle East. The tree produces seeds that are widely consumed as food.Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These other species can bedistinguished by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their seeds which are much smaller and have a soft shell. (Source: Wikipedia)

WalnutWalnuts

A walnut is the nut of any tree of the genus Juglans (Family Juglandaceae), particularly the Persian or English walnut, Juglans regia. Technically a walnut is the seed of a drupe or drupaceous nut, and thus not a true botanical nut. It is used for food after being processed while green for pickled walnuts or after full ripening for its nutmeat. Nutmeat of the eastern black walnut from the Juglans nigra is less commercially available, as are butternut nutmeats from Juglans cinerea. The walnut is nutrient-dense with protein and essential fatty acids. (Source: Wikipedia)

other nutsOther nuts

Any other of the nuts that don’t fit in the above classifications.

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