Other fruits

This page shows all other fruits by categories.

CarobCarob

Ceratonia siliqua, commonly known as the carob tree, St John’s-bread, or locust bean (not to be confused with the African locust bean) is a species of flowering evergreen shrub or tree in the pea family, Fabaceae. It is widely cultivated for its edible pods, and as an ornamental tree in gardens. The ripe, dried pod is often ground to carob powder, which is used to replace cocoa powder. Carob bars, an alternative to chocolate bars, are often available in health-food stores. (Source: Wikipedia)

Mulberrymulberry

Morus, a genus of flowering plants in the family Moraceae, comprises 10–16 species of deciduous trees commonly known as mulberries, growing wild and under cultivation in many temperate world regions.

The closely related genus Broussonetia is also commonly known as mulberry, notably the paper mulberry, Broussonetia papyrifera. Mulberries are fast-growing when young, but soon become slow-growing and rarely exceed 10–15 m (33–49 ft) tall. The leaves are alternately arranged, simple and often lobed; lobes are more common on juvenile shoots than on mature trees. The leaves are serrated on the margin. (Source: Wikipedia)

pomegranatePomegranate

The pomegranate (/ˈpɒmᵻɡrænᵻt/), botanical name Punica granatum, is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree in the family Lythraceae that grows between 5 and 8 m (16 and 26 ft) tall.

In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February, and in the Southern Hemisphere from March to May. (Source: Wikipedia)

SapodillaSapodilla

Manilkara zapota, commonly known as the sapodilla (/ˌsæpəˈdɪlə/), is a long-lived, evergreen tree native to southern Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. An example natural occurrence is in coastal Yucatán in the Petenes mangroves ecoregion, where it is a subdominant plant species. It was introduced to the Philippines during Spanish colonization. It is grown in large quantities in India, Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Mexico.

The name “zapota” from the Spanish zapote [θaˈpote] ultimately derives from the Nahuatl word tzapotl. (Source: Wikipedia)

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