Mulberry

mulberryMorus, a genus of flowering plants in the family Moraceae, comprises 10–16 species of deciduous trees commonly known as mulberries, growing wild and under cultivation in many temperate world regions.

The closely related genus Broussonetia is also commonly known as mulberry, notably the paper mulberry, Broussonetia papyrifera. Mulberries are fast-growing when young, but soon become slow-growing and rarely exceed 10–15 m (33–49 ft) tall. The leaves are alternately arranged, simple and often lobed; lobes are more common on juvenile shoots than on mature trees. The leaves are serrated on the margin.

The trees can be monoecious or dioecious. The mulberry fruit is a multiple fruit, 2–3 cm (0.79–1.18 in) long. Immature fruits are white, green, or pale yellow. In most species the fruits turn pink and then red while ripening, then dark purple or black, and have a sweet flavor when fully ripe. The fruits of the white-fruited cultivar are white when ripe; the fruit of this cultivar is also sweet, but has a very bland flavor compared with darker varieties.

Mulberries can be grown from seed, and this is often advised as seedling-grown trees are generally of better shape and health, but they are most often planted from large cuttings which root readily. The mulberry plants which are allowed to grow tall with a crown height of 5–6 feet from ground level and a stem girth of 4–5 inches or more is called tree mulberry. They are specially raised with the help of well-grown saplings 8–10 months old of any of the varieties recommended for rain-fed areas like S-13 (for red loamy soil) or S-34 (black cotton soil) which are tolerant to drought or soil-moisture stress conditions. Usually, the plantation is raised and in block formation with a spacing of 6 feet × 6 feet, or 8 feet × 8 feet, as plant to plant and row to row distance. The plants are usually pruned once a year during the monsoon season (July – August) to a height of 5–6 feet and allowed to grow with a maximum of 8–10 shoots at the crown. The leaves are harvested three or four times a year by a leaf-picking method[clarification needed] under rain-fed or semiarid conditions, depending on the monsoon. (Source: Wikipedia)

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New mulberry trees ready to move to the land

Growing some new mulberry trees in Bangkok in my garden. Just from sticks that I cut of from a bigger tree. They always do well. I think this tree is one of the easiest trees to multiply. (actually have done it many times before so we already have many trees on our land.) Just waiting […]

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New mulberry trees ready to move to the land

Growing some new mulberry trees in Bangkok in my garden. Just from sticks that I cut of from a bigger tree. They always do well. I think this tree is one of the easiest trees to multiply. (actually have done it many times before so we already have many trees on our land.) Just waiting […]

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