Root, bulb, and tuberous vegetables

This page shows all Fruit bearing vegetables by categories.

CarrotCarrots

The carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow varieties exist.

Carrots are grown from seed and can take up to four months (120 days) to mature, but many varieties mature in 70 to 80 days under the right conditions. They grow best in full sun but tolerate some shade. The optimum temperature is 16 to 21 °C (61 to 70 °F). The ideal soil is deep, loose and well-drained, sandy or loamy, with a pH of 6.3 to 6.8. (Source: Wikipedia)

TurnipsTurnips

The turnip or white turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) is a root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates worldwide for its white, bulbous taproot.Small, tender varieties are grown for human consumption, while larger varieties are grown as feed for livestock.

As a root crop, turnips grow best in cool weather; hot temperatures cause the roots to become woody and bad-tasting. They are typically planted in the spring in cold-weather climates (such as the northern US and Canada) where the growing season is only 3–4 months. In temperate climates (ones with a growing season of 5–6 months), turnips may also be planted in late summer for a second fall crop. In warm-weather climates (7 or more month growing season), they are planted in the fall. 55–60 days is the average time from planting to harvest. (Source: Wikipedia)

GarlicGarlic

Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium.Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive,[2] and rakkyo.[3] With a history of human use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia,[4] and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown year-round in mild climates. While sexual propagation of garlic is indeed possible, nearly all of the garlic in cultivation is propagated asexually, by planting individual cloves in the ground.[8] In cold climates, cloves are planted in the autumn, about six weeks before the soil freezes, and harvested in late spring. The cloves must be planted at sufficient depth to prevent freeze/thaw which causes mold or white rot.[12] Garlic plants are usually very hardy, and are not attacked by many pests or diseases. Garlic plants are said to repel rabbits and moles.[3] Two of the major pathogens that attack garlic are nematodes and white rot disease, which remain in the soil indefinitely after the ground has become infected.[8] Garlic also can suffer from pink root, a typically nonfatal disease that stunts the roots and turns them pink or red. (Sopurce: Wikipedia)

OnionOnions (incl. shallots)

Scallion, green onion, and spring onion are English names for various Allium species. All of the Allium have hollow green leaves (like the common onion), but these are used while they lack a fully developed root bulb.

Scallions have various other common names throughout the world. These names include spring onion, green onion, table onion, salad onion, onion stick, long onion, baby onion, precious onion, yard onion, gibbon, syboe, or scally onion. (Source: Wikipedia)

LeekLeeks & other alliaceous vegetables

The leek is a vegetable that belongs, along with onion and garlic, to the genus Allium, currently placed in family Amaryllidaceae, subfamily Allioideae. Historically, many scientific names were used for leeks, which are now treated as cultivars of Allium ampeloprasum. Two related vegetables, elephant garlic and Kurrat, are also cultivars of A. ampeloprasum, although different in their uses as food.

eeks are easy to grow from seed and tolerate standing in the field for an extended harvest. Leeks usually reach maturity in the autumn months, and they have few pest or disease problems. Leeks can be bunched and harvested early when they are about the size of a finger or pencil, or they can be thinned and allowed to grow to a much larger mature size. Hilling leeks can produce better specimens. (Source: Wikipedia)

Other root, bulb, or tuberous vegetablesOther root, bulb, or tuberous vegetables

Any other of the root. bulb, or tuberous vegetables that don’t fit in the above classifications.

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